Why You Need a Whole House Water Filtration System

Most people you know probably don’t own a whole house water filtration system. Because of this, it is tempting to think that they are not really necessary.

However, while water quality does vary from place to place, there are good reasons why everyone should have a whole house water filtration system installed in their home.

Here are just a few of the better reasons to consider such an upgrade.

Contaminants Aren’t Found Right Away

There have been many cases in which strange contaminants have been found in drinking water. For instance, health industry experts are becoming concerned about pharmaceuticals (and their by-products) contaminating our drinking water. These contaminants have already been found to be harmful. Certain species of aquatic life have suffered adverse effects after being exposed to human-generated wastewater containing pharmaceuticals.

The takeaway: You never know what might be lurking in your water supply unless you conduct thorough testing. Of course, the authorities will issue a warning if the local drinking water is found to be contaminated. But the problem is that these alert systems are not triggered until the contaminant has been detected. In many cases, this won’t happen until some degree of harm has already been done.

Water Affects Every Aspect of Life

Those of you who are already filtering their drinking water might be thinking: “I don’t need to filter all of my water… just the stuff I drink!”

As far as your health is concerned, it is true that drinking water filtration of is the most important aspect. Still, water can affect you and your home in many other ways.

For example, think about how long you are in contact with the water while showering. Your skin can absorb a certain amount of water when in direct contact. If that water contains certain types of contaminants, they will also be absorbed.

Thus, showering can be an indirect source of toxins affecting your body. Upon checking, we did find a study in which this idea has been tested. When human skin soaked up contaminated water, it was found to have absorbed about 64% of the toxins.

Whole-House Systems Tend To Be More Effective

While this is not an absolute rule, it is usually the case. Units that are designed for whole-house filtration tend to be larger and they tend to have more stages of filtering action.

In addition, they have to work harder than a tap-fitted filter, so they also tend to be designed in a more durable manner. More effective filtration means more toxins removed with fewer problems to deal with.

More Contaminants Removed is Better

It’s good to find a whole house filter that will remove as many different contaminants as possible. Small and simple water filters might be easier to use, but they just can’t remove as much of the harmful stuff your water might contain.

To get an idea of how good a particular filter is, you should first look at the packaging. Look for something that says “NSF-Certified.” NSF International is an organization that tests and sets standards for water filters and other products. Once you know that they have tested and certified a certain model, you can enter the product information on this website and see if it meets your filtration requirements. You will be able to see every known contaminant that it does (or doesn’t) remove. And there are other resources that can help you find the best whole house water filters for your needs.

No Significant Reduction in Water Flow

As you may know, there are a lot of options when it comes to filtering water.

A whole-house filtration system is the largest and most involved; simple filtration pitchers are the smallest and easiest to use.

That said, in case you’ve used a water filter pitcher before, you will have experienced one annoying fact first hand: Slow filtration.

The same can apply to other types of point-of-use water filters like countertop and under sink systems. The problem is that, without further assistance (like a pressure pump), a water filter may slow down water flow significantly.

As a result, it can take quite a while for the water to soak through. The better the filter, the longer it is likely to take. The filtration will slow down even more after a filter becomes clogged.

Most often, this is not the case for whole house water filters, which are rated to at certain service and peak flow rates. Unless you are single and live in a small apartment you should choose a system with at least 8 gallons per minute service flow rate.

Water Scale No Longer a Problem

You might have noticed a thin white film that your water leaves when it evaporates. What you are seeing is hard water minerals like calcium and magnesium that are present in your water supply.

These minerals aren’t dangerous for our well-being, but imagine what this residue can do to your water pipes and home appliances over time.

If you are seeing grungy yellowish or reddish build-up, that is often the result of high iron or manganese levels. If the concentrations of these metals are above a certain threshold, they can become a major issue. A little bit shouldn’t be a problem, although it may reduce the service life of your plumbing system a tiny bit. Of course, if you filter all the water before as it enters your home, this problem is neatly eliminated.

Dealing with the Consequences

Unfortunately, we no longer live in a pristine environment. We can blame whoever we want, but at the end of the day, we still have to deal with the consequences.

If you are going to make a commitment to clean water for you and your household, you might as well go all the way with that commitment and go whole house.

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