How To Know What Type Of Chainsaw Chain You Need

There are lots of chainsaw chains out there, that vary in size, type and feature. More so, there are several ways to find the right chain for your chainsaw, first things first: knowing the manufacturer of the chainsaw, then finding out about the parts you might need to buy later on if anything goes wrong.

Over time, you might want to change the chains of your chainsaw, you need to know what to do when the time comes. The first thing you should look out for is the manufacturer’s manual, by doing this you will know the type of chain you’ll need to buy and so it fits your chainsaw.

How Do I Know What Type of Chainsaw Chain I Need?

Finding the right chainsaw chain is not that hard: you need to understand three things: the measurement, chisel and chain arrangement. More so, it’s cool you know that there are cordless chainsaws that are very easy to use and operate and less noisy. Furthermore here are the things to know if you want to change the cabin of your saw.

Measurement of your chain

There are three different forms of chain measurement that can fit your bar, and they’re the gauge, number of chains and pitch.

●      The Pitch

The pitch of a chain saw is the measurement that defines how close the links exist on the chainsaw chain. Pitches usually have different measurements: a larger pitch is mostly on heavier and bigger chainsaws. More so, it’s very important to know the measurement properly. Because it has to be compatible with the bar tip rocket and the saw sprocket. Pitches are measured at 0.325” and 3/8”, check the precise measurement before you replace your chain.

●      The Gauge.

The chain saw gauge is the measurement that clarifies the density of the drive links, most especially the part of the drive links that fits the guide bar grooves. If the links are thick, then the chains are strong and heavy. You must make sure you buy a chain gauge that matches the chainsaw and when buying you should also consider the job you plan on using the chain saw for. More so, light machines are fast but not always effective.

●      Number Of Chains

The chains determine the size required in the chain. But this doesn’t define the length of the chain. Selecting the perfect chain for your chainsaw is dependent on three things: the pitch, the gauge and the number of chains. When replacing your chain, it’s important you know the number of chains because the number isn’t always stated in the manual: so you buy the right number of chains that fits your chain saw.

The Chain Arrangement

Once you know the size of the chain for your chainsaw, you would want your chain to be properly arranged, here’s how you can do that;

●      Full complement chain

These chains have the highest quantity of teeth; they are made to be fast and more so smooth, they are mostly used by chainsaw users who do a lot of climbing. They are the fastest of all chain arrangements.

●      Full Skip Chains

Full skip chains are strong, so they are used for cutting for a long period, they are also good for clearing chips, but they have few cutting teeth and with this, you need to sharpen them often.

●      Semi-Skip Chains

Half of the teeth of these chains are close together while the other half are far apart. They’re versatile but not so popular.

Selecting The Right Chisel

Aside from the arrangement and measurements of chains, you also need to put into consideration the type of chisel you might need. The chisel determines how the cutting teeth are cast on the chain saw, and this, in turn, determines how the chainsaw cuts through the wood. There are three types of chisels namely; Full Chisel chain, semi-chisel chairs, and low profile chains.

●      Full Chisel Chains

This type of chisel is usually used by experienced chainsaw users, the risk of using a full chisel chain is high. They’re used to cutting through hardwoods. Full chisel chains have a much higher risk of kickback, and it’s all the more reason it should be used by a professional.

●      Semi-Chisel Chains.

Semi chisel chains have a low risk of kickback, and these chains are not strong enough to cut through hardwood. Their cutting teeth have rounded edges; these types of chisel chains are mostly used for domestic use, and they don’t usually require sharpening.

●      Low Profile Chains

These chains are used for beginner chainsaw users plus they are less likely to include a kickback during use. The chains are rampant in retail stores.

Finally, knowing the make and model of your saw is a starting point and a good way to look for the perfect chain, and if you have a problem knowing the make and model, you can ask for help from a dealer.

 

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